11 Proven Methods on How to Clean Ice Cream Stains from a Recliner

I love ice cream. I also really like to relax and lounge around in my recliner, preferably without any clothes on. What could be better than eating a pint of Rocky Road while watching the game?

Well, how about spilling some chocolate on your favorite chair? It’s not an uncommon occurrence for me to spill my ice cream all over the cushions of my recliner and it drives me crazy trying to get that sticky mess out!

There are many ways you can remove this stain from your upholstery, but here are tried-and-true methods on how to clean ice cream stains from a recliner.

 

Methods to Clean Chocolate/Ice Cream Stains on a Recliner

Method One: Grab a paste of dry shampoo and cornstarch. Rub the mixture into the stain to loosen it up, then remove with a towel or rag.

Warning! This may cause your recliner to smell like you’ve been working out all day at some pungent gym locker room, so be careful not to let this mix touch your clothes.

This method is best for upholstery that’s made from cotton, linen, or other natural fibers.

Method Two: Mix a paste of canned air and toothpaste with a little dish soap to make it stickier. Apply the mixture to the stain while gently rubbing in circles until you can see the stain start to lift.

This method is best for upholstery that’s made from leather or other animal hides, but not recommended for suede fabrics since they can be damaged by toothpaste.

Method Three: Grab a jar of peanut butter and some paper towels with distilled white vinegar in a spray bottle nearby.  Apply the peanut butter generously to cover the stain and then take a paper towel that’s been sprayed with distilled white vinegar, dab at the spot until you can see it start to lift.

This method is best for upholstery made from cotton or other natural fibers.

Method Four: Apply a generous amount of cooking oil onto the stain and use a clean, white cloth to dab it until you can see the stain start to lift.

This method is best for upholstery with synthetic or painted fabrics since oil breaks down latex paint or ink in some dyes.

Method Five: Combine four parts hydrogen peroxide with one part dish soap—or two teaspoons to a quart of water—and spray the solution onto the stain.

This method is best for upholstery with cotton or other natural fibers, but it may not be as effective on stains that are old and set in.

Method Six: Combine equal parts white vinegar to dish soap (or one teaspoon to a pint of water) 

Spray the solution onto the stain and dab with a clean cloth until you can see it start to lift. This is another great method for upholstery that has cotton or natural fibers but may not be as effective on old stains.

Method Seven: Combine two parts rubbing alcohol with one part dish soap in an ice cube tray and freeze for four hours.

Pop out the cubes and rub them over your stain before letting it air dry, or use a hair drier to get rid of any remaining moisture after you’ve rubbed on the ice. This is a great option if you have upholstery with synthetic fibers like polyester that doesn’t stand up well against water and stain removal solutions.

Method Eight: Pour boiling water over the stain and allow it to cool for up to twenty minutes before wiping away with a damp cloth

This is a great trick if you have stains that are fresh or still wet. Boil some hot water in your kitchen, pour it onto the area of concern, and wait for it to cool.

Method Nine: Use a dry clean only solvent like liquid hand soap

This is a great option if you have old stains, a deep-set, or otherwise difficult to remove with water or other methods. Pour the solvent over the stain and rub gently using your fingers before wiping away any remaining residue. If this doesn’t get the stain out, you may need to use a stronger solvent like rubbing alcohol.

Method Ten: Use vinegar and salt: This is great for removing food or drink stains that have soaked into your fabric over time. Pour some white vinegar onto the area of concern before sprinkling with table salt. Wait five minutes before wiping away any remaining residue.

Method Eleven: Use baking soda: This is a popular method for removing stains from fabrics like cotton or wool, but can also be effective on couches made of other materials as well.

Pour some damp baking soda onto the area of concern before sprinkling with water and rubbing gently using your fingers in swirling motions to work the baking soda into the fabric. Wait five minutes before wiping away any remaining residue.

 

Importance of Cleaning Your Recliner

Imagine coming home after a long day and plopping down on your recliner. It feels good to get off your feet, but how does that feel when you realize there are crumbs, stains, or sticky residue all over the chair?

You might not think it’s a big deal because you can just vacuum up whatever dirt gets on the chair, but it’s not just dirt that could be lurking on your recliner.

Your kids might have spilled a juice or some other drink while sitting in there and never mentioned anything to you about it, leaving behind stains that are now starting to set into the fabric of your furniture. Even if you have pets who occasionally scratch

 

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